The leaders of tennis are considering an exemption for players who haven’t been vaccinated

Australian Open organizers had planned to exclude players who hadn’t been vaccinated for the seasonal flu virus after it was discovered that none of the players on the 2016 tournament tour had been vaccinated….

The leaders of tennis are considering an exemption for players who haven’t been vaccinated

Australian Open organizers had planned to exclude players who hadn’t been vaccinated for the seasonal flu virus after it was discovered that none of the players on the 2016 tournament tour had been vaccinated. All 77 of the contracted players, who joined the tour in September of that year, were immune to the virus, but health officials had warned the organizers that it was a risk for players outside of the vaccine’s normal release date. “We’re not going to put players’ health at risk,” said Tennis Australia chief executive Craig Tiley. “It’s just not the way we do things here.”

But according to a new report from The Guardian, 22 of the players who took part in the Australian Open of 2018 will be completely exempt from vaccine requirements, allowing them to play, for example, if they were not vaccinated for pertussis (also known as whooping cough) or influenza. No players at the 2017 Australian Open were exempt from the exemption because they could not be vaccinated by the required time or because it wasn’t a safe time for an immunization.

The exemption is based on a World Health Organization recommendation that believes a three-week incubation period should be required before a vaccine is given. The number of players admitted to hospital last year following exposure to the virus during the first week of competition prompted officials to seek another exemption for players. Without it, there could have been dozens of players hospitalized or, at least, stalled or halted their preparations for the upcoming season.

“If these exemptions were not applied throughout the tennis world as a precautionary step, there would be health repercussions for everyone who used our sport,” the President of the Association of Tennis Professionals, Craig Tiley, wrote on The Daily Telegraph website in late July, arguing that a vaccination would promote, not discourage, future participation in tennis.

That decision brought about a 30 percent boost in immunization levels during last year’s Australian Open of 2017.

Read the full story at The Guardian.

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