The flu test: How will it impact your insurance rates?

Last week, the World Health Organization announced that, effective March 1, 2019, physicians and lab-contracted laboratories will begin using the new test for “antiviral antiviral status” of “ill persons known to be infectious.” Antiviral…

The flu test: How will it impact your insurance rates?

Last week, the World Health Organization announced that, effective March 1, 2019, physicians and lab-contracted laboratories will begin using the new test for “antiviral antiviral status” of “ill persons known to be infectious.”

Antiviral units cost between $50 and $250 a day, and have long been the first line of treatment when the World Health Organization mandates the use of such drugs for patients with the flu, according to WHO’s standard order. With the death of actress Kate Spade and fashion designer Anthony Bourdain last year among many others, WHO has deemed this a necessary move.

Though it is true that some can be administered, several doctors told The New York Times that the cost of such tests — which can take up to eight hours to test for — is prohibitive for most doctors. For this reason, and others, it is likely that insurance will likely not pay for such tests.

Though the test itself is a step in the right direction, and another measure in addressing the flu-worrying high. But how many humans will be screened? Will there be enough doctors, or just enough time? And how do you know if a physician is taking your test or whether you should follow the other employees’ recommendations?

Read the full story at The New York Times.

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