STD: First genital herpes virus OIC case is confirmed in the U.S.

The first case of genital herpes virus OIC has been detected in the United States, but health officials say they are confident it does not pose any public health risk. Female college students in…

STD: First genital herpes virus OIC case is confirmed in the U.S.

The first case of genital herpes virus OIC has been detected in the United States, but health officials say they are confident it does not pose any public health risk.

Female college students in Hampton Roads, Va., are being asked to be vigilant for the virus. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention released information about the case and discussed precautions for infection.

“Though this is a rare and highly uncommon occurrence, persons who have previously been infected with this virus may develop symptoms similar to those of genital herpes,” the CDC said.

Anyone may develop a cold sore on their body, but herpes can spread from person to person through the oral cavity and mucous membranes of the mouth and the genitalia. It is primarily transmitted through the oral and genital passages by an infected person’s saliva or vaginal secretions.

Anyone who is sexually active, regardless of the gender of the person they are engaging in sexual intercourse with, should talk to their health care provider. With most cases of genital herpes, it is easy to get the infection by having sex with an infected person. This may occur before or after an individual is infected. Infection can happen during oral sex, vaginal sex or other anal sex acts.

“Person-to-person transmission can be identified by checking on a person’s records for sexually transmitted infections, and if they have ever been infected with either HSV-1 or HSV-2 (or both) they may have developed symptoms of HSV-1 or HSV-2. They should also not have had sex or oral sex with anyone who has been infected with herpes or in previous years have oral sex with anyone who has been infected with herpes,” the CDC said.

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